woman and child on a swing

Overcoming multiple sclerosis

The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation seeks a cure and improved quality of life for those who are affected by multiple sclerosis (MS).

Over five decades, we have awarded over $18 million in grants to researchers and healthcare practitioners in hopes of discovering its cause, exploring ways in which it might be prevented, developing effective treatments, improving the quality of life for those who suffer its debilitating effects, and finding a cure.

Marilyn Hilton MS Achievement Center at UCLA

A partnership between the UCLA Department of Neurology and Southern California Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the Marilyn Hilton MS Achievement Center was developed with funds from the Hilton Foundation. Opened in 2001, the Center provides comprehensive wellness services for people with MS. In addition to these services, the Center strives to develop innovative programs for replication across the country.

The Center is named in honor of Marilyn Hilton, the late wife of Barron Hilton. Mrs. Hilton died at age 76 from complications associated with MS.

People living with MS have varying degrees of independence and ability. Accordingly, services offered by the MS Achievement Center cater to a wide range of physical, social, and emotional wellness needs. The Center also offers recreation and health education.

Results

A 2009 case study developed as part of the Multiple Sclerosis Adult Day Program Evaluation for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society attributed the following benefits to the MS Achievement Center:

  • Social support and improved quality of life
  • Empowerment
  • Better maintenance of functioning
  • Staff with extensive MS expertise
  • Early detection of medical problems
  • Improved access to medical treatment and coordination of care
  • Respite and support for family members

Resources

Investments in research

The Hilton Foundation supports research into the cause, prevention, and treatment of multiple sclerosis.  Research grants have gone to:

The Mayo Clinic to develop the first drug designed to treat the brain and spinal cord of patients with MS. This drug is currently awaiting FDA approval for clinical trial. If successful, this exploration could lead to advances in treating many types of neurologic disease, including MS.

The UCLA MS Program to fund the clinical and pre-clinical studies in support of obtaining FDA approval to use an oral estriol treatment for relapsing remitting MS.

The Myelin Repair Foundation to advance research in the field by creating systems with which to test myelin repair in human brain cells.

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society to conduct research into three strategic areas -- finding treatments for progressive MS, research into the effectiveness of assistive walking aids, and research into possible causes of MS.